Bluehost Tutorials


In addition to ease of use you also get added benefits like a free domain for a year and a Free SSL security with every account that has a dedicated IP address (exclusive to the Pro Plan). If you have a WordPress site hosted through Bluehost you get a shared SSL certificate which you can turn on in the cPanel. At $6.95 a month, it is hard to beat Bluehost’s hosting package for your WooCommerce powered WordPress store.
BigCommerce is a bit different from our other hosting plans in that it's a SaaS (software-as-a-service) provider instead of an IaaS (infrastructure-as-a-service) provider. In other words, rather than renting space on a virtual machine where you setup and configure your own site, BigCommerce provides you with an app you login to that creates and online store. 
I used blue host for hosting a blog and got a deal with a special offer. It was easy to set up, and switching my hosting to bluehost was simple. They gave me a deal since to host with them since I used wordpress. Also, when I signed up I worked with a customer service member who was extremely nice and stayed on the line with me even though they were about to close.
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
I was with Bluehost shared hosting for years until they started outbound filtering of email which causes the mail forwarding set in cpanel to break. The effect of the change was that you would get some mail forwarded, but other mail would drop and you would never know. I had to move my hosting to another company since not receiving some emails is not something I could tolerate.
As you can see, there is no such thing as a monthly BlueHost plan. The shortest plan you can buy is 12 months, there are also 24, 36 and even 60 months you can choose. It is interesting to see, that it is the 36-month plan that is the cheapest, even cheaper than the longer 60-month period. For all of those packages you have to pay in advance. These are the prices you would have to pay:
My friend’s website got hacked sometime in May or June of 2014. Bluehost managed to upsell him and make him purchase their sitelock service. My friend paid for the service, but Bluehost didn’t get his websites back up. In the end I had to jump in and troubleshoot the code for him and remove/replace the hacked files. Months later, his server got hacked again. This type, with a different type of attack that result in a similar end result. The code were inserted into many locations in his server, and seemed to have been spreading by day. My friend turned to me for help again, and in the end I went through each of the contaminated file to fix the problems and got the websites up again.
These guys are awesome, I've had them for three years and they are always up and running (unless you download and install the wrong plug-in for your wordpress site)... but you can call their customer support and within minutes, they'll have you up and running and excluding my plug-in error, the server has been up 100% of the time (and I have about 30 domains with full sites... they're not pointed or parked)... definitely get them!!1

We used their Shared Hosting plan (AUD 16.58) and were treated to 50 GB of storage, unlimited bandwidth with 10 domains. It may feel a little pricey especially since they’re limiting your storage and domains, but this could work in our favour – limited resources in shared hosting means no single client will get to hog the server, which results in stable servers for everyone.

With dedicated hosting, you are essentially renting a physical server. VPS hosting is a middle-ground option where you share a physical server with others, but you have your virtual operating system, so the server functions as if it is physically yours. WordPress hosting is of course what it sounds like—hosting optimized for WordPress customers. Let’s take a look at the plan tiers for each.
My friend’s website got hacked sometime in May or June of 2014. Bluehost managed to upsell him and make him purchase their sitelock service. My friend paid for the service, but Bluehost didn’t get his websites back up. In the end I had to jump in and troubleshoot the code for him and remove/replace the hacked files. Months later, his server got hacked again. This type, with a different type of attack that result in a similar end result. The code were inserted into many locations in his server, and seemed to have been spreading by day. My friend turned to me for help again, and in the end I went through each of the contaminated file to fix the problems and got the websites up again.

Bluehost uses the world standard cPanel which provides easy to manage website tools that novice users and advanced users alike. This makes tasks that seem complicated like creating subdomains or transferring domains incredibly user-friendly. Finally, the most notable advantage of using the cPanel is the sheer volume of users worldwide. With millions of users, it is very easy to find solutions to problems, tutorials, and advice from other users to get the most out of your website.
I tried the basic “shared” plan for several months, the so called better performing and more expensive “cloud” plan for several months and I actually experienced faster page load times with the less expensive “shared” plan and about 1/5 the downtime. Each time I was scheduled to “migrate” hosting plans, “There was a problem in completing the request” and spent several hours frantically trying to communicate with Bluehost chat and on hold over the phone. While on the cloud, my emails were completely inaccessible, for several days, and I was told an outside tech had to be called. Their recommendation to me was to use “gmail” instead. It seems Bluehost is best as a “sales” company at the moment instead of providing fast website page load times, so people can grow their data storage and legitimately grow and upgrade their hosting plans. The Bluehost chat is often times a nightmare to deal with, whether the chat program works at all after 15 minutes and more wait times or freezes as it did with me several times.
Their setup process is very easy, the service is reliable, and they have stand-out customer service. It's responsive and clear. They also have a large and helpful library of resources to make it easy to troubleshoot on your own. The service is reliable for the most part, and the interface/dashboard is clear and easy to use. If you use WordPress, Bluehost has a dedicated service for hosting WordPress sites.
Turns out Bluehost blames the site developer and the site developer blames Bluehost for any problems anyway. Although my other site with Godaddy is small in comparison, the speed of the Godaddy site is so much faster, I literally cannot even count the 1 Mississippi before the page loads. Considering the millions and billions of pages on the internet, why is it that Bluehost seems to have so many problems with my few dozen web pages? Am I one of the few unlucky ones or is any website with more than a few pages not compatible with Bluehost hosting performance anymore? Is there a site storage size, where Bluehost is no longer viable for fast page load times? Am I correct in assuming that Bluehost is not a hosting company for any website with a desire for growth in sales? Perhaps I should have discontinued with Bluehost after the 3rd site downtime, but alas, how do I know some other hosting company won’t be the same or worse? Ultimately, the question from me is. . Is Bluehost capable of providing the 2 second or less page load times for a growing ecommerce site with dozens or hundreds of products and what hosting plan price will that be?
Because Bluehost is so large and shares resources with sister companies, they can offer some of the cheapest prices for hosting. And for incredibly low prices, Bluehost plans cover most of the basics, like Wordpress hosting, VPS, solid security features, and tons of free tools to boot. But at the end of the day, you get what you pay for. Bluehost customer service is lacking, the uptime is shoddy, and their speed leaves much to be desired. Webmasters on a budget who don't anticipate a lot of traffic or support tickets will find everything they're looking for with Bluehost pricing. But if greater reliability is important to you, it's worth it to shell out the extra cash for a more customer-oriented host like SiteGround or WP Engine.

I tried the basic “shared” plan for several months, the so called better performing and more expensive “cloud” plan for several months and I actually experienced faster page load times with the less expensive “shared” plan and about 1/5 the downtime. Each time I was scheduled to “migrate” hosting plans, “There was a problem in completing the request” and spent several hours frantically trying to communicate with Bluehost chat and on hold over the phone. While on the cloud, my emails were completely inaccessible, for several days, and I was told an outside tech had to be called. Their recommendation to me was to use “gmail” instead. It seems Bluehost is best as a “sales” company at the moment instead of providing fast website page load times, so people can grow their data storage and legitimately grow and upgrade their hosting plans. The Bluehost chat is often times a nightmare to deal with, whether the chat program works at all after 15 minutes and more wait times or freezes as it did with me several times.


They have, literally, outsourced 100% of their customer support and tech support to a foreign their party that has no idea what they are doing. And even if their outsourced / 3rd party tech support was “OK”, that doesn’t excuse or explain completely cutting yourself off from your customers… the people that pay your bills. In my experience, that’s the beginning of the end for any company–when they simply do not want to have any direct contact–or feedback–from their customers.
I tried the basic “shared” plan for several months, the so called better performing and more expensive “cloud” plan for several months and I actually experienced faster page load times with the less expensive “shared” plan and about 1/5 the downtime. Each time I was scheduled to “migrate” hosting plans, “There was a problem in completing the request” and spent several hours frantically trying to communicate with Bluehost chat and on hold over the phone. While on the cloud, my emails were completely inaccessible, for several days, and I was told an outside tech had to be called. Their recommendation to me was to use “gmail” instead. It seems Bluehost is best as a “sales” company at the moment instead of providing fast website page load times, so people can grow their data storage and legitimately grow and upgrade their hosting plans. The Bluehost chat is often times a nightmare to deal with, whether the chat program works at all after 15 minutes and more wait times or freezes as it did with me several times.
This Bluehost review has revealed a lot of great things that the web host has to offer people looking for hosting. They have options for WordPress users, businesses, and people looking for the high control allotted by VPS and dedicated servers. Although their WordPress plans are slightly more expensive than other companies, like HostGator, they include features that make up for this.
They have their own "intrusion detection/prevention system" which stops their service from getting hacked, but I found out it doesn't actually protect my website. I reluctantly let the student fix my site after giving him my account details and he managed to find all kinds of flaws from the inside as well. He fixed most of them within a couple of days, from bad configuration, bad plugins, and hiding my personal email/account.
No free SSL certificate but global CDN, automatic malware removal using SiteLock security is included for free with HostGator's managed WordPress hosting plans, which gives you HackAlert monitoring service that checks your website daily and immediately notifies you if your website has been hacked or injected with malicious code. CodeGuard automatic website backup is also included. Get daily automated website backup for all web files and databases with a 1-click restore.
You don’t need that much of a storage or bandwidth. When you are just a starting business, your bandwidth and storage needs are very basic. Do not fall for unlimited bandwidth and storage in the beginning because you’ll pay for something you won’t use. If your web pages aren’t heavy and there are no downloadable materials, even a few GBs of bandwidth will be more than enough.
The dashboard can be a little difficult to navigate if you are unfamiliar with web terminology. There's not a dedicated support person for your account, so if you have any issues you can chat online or call into a call center for technical or account support. When purchasing a domain - I made the mistake of not initially purchasing the domain privacy and was bombarded by phone and email from solicitors offering web related services. I went back and purchased it, but still continue to receive e-mails related to this.
Full disclosure: if you purchase hosting via any of the links located on this comparison page, I might get a small referral commission. This does not affect any my recommendations and I am very serious about that. There are plenty of hosts that I don’t like (many of which pay out high commissions) and you can read about the hosts that I don’t recommend.
There’s so much information out there it’s enough to make a person dizzy! But that’s where this page comes in—I’ve tested both hosts over the period of an entire year and broken down everything that I think a prospective buyer should know. I have been creating websites and web properties for more than 10 years and am an expert in web hosting. I also have professional experience with hundreds of hosting companies over many years, so I know not only what’s good but I also know what’s bad.

There are two options to move your site. You can either do it yourself for free by manually transferring your files over to Bluehost. Alternatively, you can use the Website Transfer service to migrate up to five sites and 20 email accounts from your former hosting company. This service costs $149.99. Don’t forget; you’ll need to add the FTP option to your hosting package before you can migrate an existing site.
If you cancel within 30 days and your plan includes a free domain, Bluehost will deduct a non-refundable domain fee of 15.99 from your refund. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. You may transfer it to another registrar or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. Please note newly registered domains cannot be transferred to another registrar during the first 60 days of the registration period. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you renew it.
Almost all the services offer some sort of page builder that makes it easy to drag and drop to build your page. These are great for getting started, but they often lock you into the service. Most page builders are proprietary to the service, or don't create HTML that's portable enough to be easily moved to another service if you decide it's necessary.

Their knowledgebase is full of articles, guides, how-to's, and instructions to get you through almost any problem. They answer their client's most FAQ (frequently asked questions) here as well. The best part about this knowledgebase is that it is nicely organized. You can easily find articles on the topic you desire. Or, search the entire system for a specific questions.
I am not incredibly savvy when it comes to creating and managing a website, so I was confused about the different levels of purchase available. I was not sure what level of traffic I would receive on my blog, or the type of advertisement options I might want available. I also was not sure about affiliate programs. Blue Host also prompts you to use Word Press, which is fine for my site, but may not work for others. I think the push to use this specific secondary source as a blog site might interfere with the work you do online.
Sean Garrity is a Managing Editor at HostingAdvice with more than 10 years of experience researching, writing, and editing for numerous industry-specific trade publications. At HostingAdvice, Sean is charged with orchestrating the site’s content production, overseeing a team of writers, and ensuring the quality of feature and how-to articles. His goal is to keep organizations and entrepreneurs informed on the latest trends and technologies that can help them streamline operations and thrive online. When he isn’t wrapped up in discussions with experts, you can find Sean in front of his monitor, looking for what’s coming next in the fast-changing tech landscape.
Sales agent called me 6 hours before our appt so we weren't both available for the call as we had specified. I asked him to schedule an appt for later he said that he would only schedule it to discuss more services and that it wasn't going to be so that I could express how I believe I'm not getting their service as promised. Agent was rude and defensive. He raised his voice and when I pointed out his lack of good customer service he responded, "I am not customer service, I am sales". I ended the call at that point.
With the Standard plan or Enhanced plan, you get a 4 x 2.5GHz CPU. The Premium plan offers you a 4 x 3.3GHz CPU. Storage is 1 TB (mirrored), and RAM starts at 4 GB at the Standard level, ranging up to 16 GB at the Premium tier. You get 5 TB of bandwidth at the Standard tier, 10 TB at the Enhanced tier, and 15 TB at Premium. One domain is included with every plan. You get three IP addresses at Standard, four at Enhanced, and five at Premium. All plans are backed by 24/7 service and a money-back guarantee.
Just like SiteGround, BlueHost uses Weebly as their primary website builder. However, there is a downside, as you can’t put your website in a subdomain. Apart from that, it’s a very powerful and versatile builder and it is good to see BlueHost including it. Weebly website has been used in order to see how the BlueHost servers work under bigger pressure. I set it up with a Flash file and plenty other additions:
Uptime: Like with most providers, HostGator promises a 99.9% uptime.  If this service level isn’t met within a given month, HostGator guarantees to compensate users for that entire month. This, of course, only applies to unexpected downtime and doesn’t include server maintenance. This guarantee just shows how confident HostGator is on their service.
I've had Bluehost for over a year and am deeply disappointed. The people who run the service spend all their time pitching extra services instead of making their service better. When I sought advice from them, they recommended I buy services that I later found I didn't need. (They lied to me.) When I tried to turn off the autorenew for these services, I was told by their rep that THERE WAS NO WAY TO TURN OFF AUTORENEW. In other words, they would keep recharging my card forever. I told the rep flatly that they had no legal right to charge my card for a service that I canceled. He said he turned it off, but they didn't, and have been emailing everyday. (I canceled my card to avoid the autorenew.) I could go on with other complaints but will keep this short. Don't use them. They're gangsters.
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